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Browse POLICY Project (1995-2006) Materials

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Asia and the Near East

  • Countries in the Asia-Pacific region have reached a crossroads in their HIV/AIDS response. The ability of countries in the region to maintain low national HIV prevalence levels will depend on their success in rapidly scaling up prevention, care, and treatment. The argument for responding quickly is compelling: the longer governments wait to adopt interventions, the higher the eventual cost in lives, productivity, and national as well as household medical expenses. The leadership and resources needed for rapid scale up requires strong political commitment and action from the countries’ highest leaders. “Act Now”—a joint publication of the Asia-Pacific Leadership Forum on HIV/AIDS and Development (APLF), UNAIDS, and the USAID-funded POLICY Project—encourages leaders from across the region to vigorously combat the epidemic before the situation worsens. Responses will have their greatest impact if countries act when national prevalence is still low.
    English
    ANE_ActNow.pdf
  • The POLICY Project conducted assessments of adolescent and youth reproductive health in 13 countries in the Asia and Near East (ANE) region that represent diverse population sizes and geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic settings. The countries included Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Yemen in the Near East; Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka in South Asia; and Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam in Southeast Asia. In 2000, there were 354 million young people ages 15–24 in these 13 countries combined. The purpose of the assessments was to highlight the reproductive health status of adolescents and youth in each country within the context of the lives of young males and females.
    English
    arh.cfm
  • This report includes results from 69 countries, including most low- and middle-income countries with more than 10,000 people living with HIV in 2005. The information presented here relies on national service statistics and expert assessment. These data focus on the quantity of services provided and do not address the quality of those services. In many countries, national consensus workshops were held to validate the data. Estimates of the population in need of each service have been derived from demographic and epidemiological statistics and may not correspond to national estimates of need, but are used here to present coverage estimates that are comparable across countries and regions. For countries that did not participate in the survey, we have used regional averages to estimate the number of people served. The results should be interpreted with caution, but are useful in indicating the progress made in the last two years toward future goals. For all regions combined, prevention services are provided to about 33% of sex workers, 9% of men who have sex with men, 34% of prisoners, and 16% of children living on the street. Twenty-six countries reported having prevention programs for injecting drug users, most from Eastern Europe and Asia. The most common type of program was information and education on risk reduction, which is provided for about one million injecting drug users. Needle and syringe exchange programs reach less than half as many (400,000) and drug substitution programs reach only about 32,000. Estimates of the number of injecting drug users are highly uncertain, but coverage of harm reduction programs is still low in most lowand middle-income countries. In short, significant progress has been made in most areas since 2001, but the only programs that provide access to most people who need services are AIDS education in the schools and condoms. Some regions have achieved universal access for some services, such as ART in Latin America. In most other areas, greater effort will be required to expand services to meet the goal of universal access.
    English
    HIVCoverage20051.pdf
  • Excel file with the country annex tables to accompany the document, "Coverage of selected services for HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment in low- and middle-income countries in 2005."
    English
    FINAL HIV Coverage Survey 2005 - Country Annex Tables.xls
  • This report assesses how the Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS (GIPA) Principle is being implemented in the ANE region. Five USAID Missions and 12 implementing agencies (IAs) in the region participated in the assessment, which was undertaken in May and June 2003 in Cambodia, India, Nepal, Philippines, and Viet Nam. The purpose of the assessment was to ascertain how Missions, IAs, and NGOs are incorporating GIPA principles into their organizations and into the programmatic work they support and implement. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 23 respondents from Missions, IAs, and NGOs.
    English
    ANE_GIPA.pdf
  • To learn more about how countries have been addressing RH-and family planning (FP) in particular-commodities and where significant advocacy efforts have occurred, the POLICY Project, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) undertook a global survey of local and international, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and public officials. The survey’s goal was to gather information on countries' processes and activities aimed at meeting current and future contraceptive commodity needs. This report focuses principally on the results of the survey; however, it also includes complementary findings from additional research on recent and current CS activities.
    English
    RHCS Paper Final.pdf
  • Although contraceptive use has risen impressively in many countries over the last few decades, there have been occasional flat periods that have raised serious concerns about the effectiveness of the national family planning programs involved. Of special concern are a few instances in the Asia and Near East region, where interruptions of an established upward trend in contraceptive use have raised troubling policy and program questions for both governments and international donor agencies. Issues exist concerning the actual frequency of plateaus in contraceptive increase, why they occur, why most are so brief, and what actions should be taken when they occur. The analysis reported here uses a large set of national surveys to explore especially the first of those questions and to offer suggestions as to the other three.
    English
    wps-10.pdf
  • The POLICY Project conducted assessments of adolescent and youth reproductive health in 13 countries in the Asia and Near East (ANE) region that represent diverse population sizes and geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic settings. The countries include Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Yemen in the Near East; Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka in South Asia; and Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam in Southeast Asia. In 2000, the 13 countries accounted for a total of 354 million young people ages 15 to 24 years. The purpose of the assessments was to highlight the reproductive health status of adolescents and youth in each country within the context of the lives of young males and females.
    English
    op-09.pdf