Welcome to the Publication Archives of USAID-funded Health Policy Projects.

Browse POLICY Project (1995-2006) Materials

↑ top

Files will load from www.policyproject.com.

List entries are alphabetical by title and contain the title, abstract, language, and then the filename which is hyperlinked and will open in a new browser window. Many files are PDFs but some of the older ones are Word documents.

Cambodia

HP+ More recent Cambodia publications are available.

  • English
    ARH_Cambodia.pdf
  • As part of the POLICY Project’s investigations into the delivery of family planning (FP) services in the context of high HIV prevalence, six focus group discussions were held in Cambodia in December 2004. The aim of these discussions was to document the views of FP users, service providers, and HIV-positive (HIV+) women on the accessibility and quality of FP services, particularly in light of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cambodia.
    English
    CamFP-HIV_FGDs.pdf
  • Involving men in reproductive healthcare could help Cambodia achieve some major development goals, such as a decreased maternal mortality rate and an increased contraceptive prevalence rate. Involving men could also help reduce the overall prevalence of HIV/AIDS—an outcome possible only if men are involved not just as clients of RH care but also as partners, service providers, policymakers, teachers, and project managers. Until today, male involvement in RH in Cambodia has been relatively underdeveloped. Despite the availability of a few contraceptive methods for men, maternal and child health (MCH) programs provide most RH care, strategic plans and services lack indicators for men, and most service providers are not equipped or trained to accommodate male clients. RH facilities tend to be female-oriented; as a result, men are often reluctant to avail themselves of services. Men’s reluctance to access RH care can also mean that barriers to accessing health, such as distance and cost, which affect both men and women, are even more influential in preventing men from seeking RH counseling or treatment or even seeking services as partners. To expand and strengthen male involvement in reproductive health in Cambodia, this report offers the following recommendations: • A set of guidelines to mainstream male involvement need to be developed and distributed. • Agencies interested in implementing male involvement in reproductive health must plan for a long-term commitment. • Campaigns need to be implemented that educate seemingly “low-risk” social and demographic groups. • Current education campaigns need to be reviewed in the context of male involvement and should not, for example, reinforce gender inequities or the notion that condom use is restricted only to high-risk situations. • Existing services should be made more “male-friendly,” with service providers undergoing additional training and engaging in effective outreach activities. • The private health sector should be directly involved in efforts that foster male involvement.
    English
    MaleInvolv_Cam.pdf
  • This report examines the present situation of both the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cambodia and the progress of its FP program. It examines the trends in funding, staff resources, impact of the epidemic on personnel, and the activities of the government, private health sector and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in both sectors. Finally, the report will examine the efforts being made to integrate HIV/AIDS and FP services so that they jointly address these issues that are having such a profound effect on Cambodia’s development.
    English
    CamFP-HIV_analysis.pdf
  • Over the past decade, Cambodia has made good progress in re-establishing a nationwide health system that had been devastated by decades of civil conflict. The efforts of the Ministry of Health and nongovernmental organizations to expand family planning services have had an impact on individual lives and most health indicators. Between 1995 and 2000, the contraceptive prevalence rate for married couples practicing modern family planning methods increased from 7 to 18.5 percent. The risk that women will die due to pregnancy-related causes, while still quite high, has also been greatly reduced due to lower fertility and improved access to service provision. Despite these achievements, Cambodia faces great challenges. This booklet reviews Cambodia's current reproductive health situation and focuses on the challenges ahead for family planning and safe motherhood programs. (Hard copy available in English and Khmer)
    English
    CAM_SavingLives.pdf
  • This case study focuses on Cambodia, where a group of advocates recognized that involving men was an important aspect of improving the country's reproductive health status. Members of MEDiCAM, a large network of health nongovernmental organizations in Cambodia, formed the Reproductive Health Promotion Working Group (RHPWG), with technical assistance from the POLICY Project. Working as a bridge between implementers and policymakers, the RHPWG identified male involvement in reproductive health as its top advocacy priority. Through concerted advocacy efforts, the group succeeded in garnering policymaker support and worked with relevant ministries and other stakeholders to establish standard guidelines for male involvement programs. The draft guidelines were structured to align with the major components of the country's forthcoming Strategic Plan for Reproductive Health in Cambodia (2006-2010), which now refers explicitly to male involvement in several places. Cambodia's experience is a good model for other countries seeking to strengthen male involvement initiatives through advocacy, policy development, and implementation.
    English
    Cambodia MI casestudy final 1 24 06.doc
  • A study of the print media in Cambodia in 2003 found that HIV/AIDS reporting was often sensationalistic or voyeuristic, displaying little respect for the dignity of people living with HIV/AIDS who were usually depicted as victims or objects of sympathy. This resource has been developed as a result of recognition that there was no media guide to meet the growing demands of reporters covering the increasingly complex HIV/AIDS issues.
    English
    CAM_MediaGuide.pdf
  • This publication provides a concise overview of the current situation; analyzes the future course and impact of HIV/AIDS in the region; outlines recommendations for responding to the epidemic; and highlights promising programs that are already underway. Importantly, the report is designed as a user-friendly tool to help both government policymakers and civil society advocates encourage policy dialogue and commitment to address HIV/AIDS throughout the region. Focusing on the HIV/AIDS situation in Cambodia, the People's Democratic Republic of Laos, Thailand, and Viet Nam, the report also draws attention to six issues that are of particular concern in the region: 1) Women and HIV/AIDS, 2) Children Affected by HIV/AIDS, 3) Health Care Delivery and Costs, 4) Implications for Development, 5) Cross-border Issues, and 6) HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis. Promoting an enabling policy environment, responding to the entire continuum of care (including prevention, care, and mitigation), and empowering vulnerable groups are among the strategies that are noted as central to an effective HIV/AIDS response in the Mekong Region.
    English
    HIV_Mekong.pdf
  • This report assesses how the Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS (GIPA) Principle is being implemented in the ANE region. Five USAID Missions and 12 implementing agencies (IAs) in the region participated in the assessment, which was undertaken in May and June 2003 in Cambodia, India, Nepal, Philippines, and Viet Nam. The purpose of the assessment was to ascertain how Missions, IAs, and NGOs are incorporating GIPA principles into their organizations and into the programmatic work they support and implement. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 23 respondents from Missions, IAs, and NGOs.
    English
    ANE_GIPA.pdf
  • Reproductive Health Promotion Working Group advocacy material
    English
    CAM_MaleInvolveEng.pdf
  • Worldwide, over 500,000 women and girls die of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth each year. The tragedy - and opportunity - is that most of these deaths can be prevented with cost-effective health care services. POLICY's MNPI series provides country-specific data on maternal and neonatal health programs in more than 30 developing countries. Based on a study conducted by the Futures Group and funded through the MEASURE Evaluation Project, the MNPI is a tool that can be used to: Assess current health care services; Identify program strengths and weaknesses; Plan strategies to address deficiencies; Encourage political and popular support for appropriate action; and Track progress over time.
    English
    Cambodia_MNPI.pdf
  • English
    2005Cambodia.pdf
  • English
    CAM_MSM.pdf
  • The POLICY Project prepared this paper as part of a study of the status of family planning in four countries hit hard by HIV/AIDS: Ethiopia, Kenya, Zambia, and Cambodia.
    English
    Working Paper 17- FP HIV Integration Synthesis.doc
  • The POLICY Project, in collaboration with the Ministry of Social Affairs, Veterans, and Youth Rehabilitation, and CARE Cambodia, facilitated a two-day workshop on August 23 and 24th, 2004, titled 'Orphans and Vulnerable Children Dialogue Workshop'. Participants included a multi-sector group of representatives from government ministries, NGOs, Civil Society groups, donors, Bhuddist pagodas, people living with HIV/AIDS, and children who have been orphaned due to HIV/AIDS. The purpose of the workshop was to disseminate findings of two research studies that have been conducted by the POLICY Project and CARE, Cambodia, in urban and rural areas of Cambodia; to make program and policy recomendations for improving Cambodia's response to the OVC crisis; and to coordinate with stakeholders from all sectors in order to move forward to address OVC issues at the program and policy levels. This report provided a summary of the activities and results of the workshop. (Hard copy available in English and Khmer)
    English
    CAM_OVC_PolicyDialogue.pdf
  • The following report provides a summary analysis of the resources required to achieve the broad objectives outlined in Cambodia’s National Strategic Plan (NSP). This report outlines the costs associated with each strategic objective.
    English
    CAM_costing.pdf
  • This report is a result of qualitative research investigating the challenges to GIPA, conducted in Cambodia from March 2003 - March 2005, as well as outcomes from training programs conducted with HIV-positive Cambodians over the same period. The research seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the role of HIV-positive people in the Cambodian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The research examined the experiences and perceptions of HIV-positive people, HIV/AIDS service providers, policy makers and programmers related to the challenges to HIV-positive people's meaningful involvement in the design and implementation of AIDS policy and programming in Cambodia. The study also gathered information from HIV-positive people and HIV/AIDS service providers, policy makers and programmers to identify the necessary mechanisms to promote and sustain involvement. The study provided an opportunity to reflect on the level of involvement of people infected and affected by HIV and AIDS and to promote dialogue amongst HIV-positive people and other stake-holders to secure their greater involvement in Cambodia's response to the epidemic.
    English
    CAM_StepsToEmpower_En.pdf
  • Cambodia is among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Asia. In 2003, an estimated 123,100 adults in Cambodia were living with HIV/AIDS and 60,000 children were affected by HIV/AIDS. In responding to the epidemic, donors, policymakers, and program planners have had little country-specific information regarding the impact of HIV/AIDS and the effectiveness of interventions, impeding their ability to make decisions regarding resource allocation and program design. In response to this lack of data, the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) and the POLICY Project carried out this study, which served a dual purpose: (1) to identify the social and economic impact that HIV/AIDS is having on children, adolescents, and their guardians, and (2) to help policymakers, donors, and development partners identify policies and programs that would likely be effective in mitigating the impact of HIV/AIDS. This study demonstrates that it is imperative that policymakers, program managers, donors, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), PLHAs, and orphans and vulnerable children work together to identify a means of providing services that target the most vulnerable children while addressing the unique needs of every child. The recommendations set forth in this study are based on the study findings, as well as findings from a workshop that was held in August 2004.
    English
    CAM_OVC_En.pdf
  • Cambodia is among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Asia. In 2003, an estimated 123,100 adults in Cambodia were living with HIV/AIDS and 60,000 children were affected by HIV/AIDS. In responding to the epidemic, donors, policymakers, and program planners have had little country-specific information regarding the impact of HIV/AIDS and the effectiveness of interventions, impeding their ability to make decisions regarding resource allocation and program design. In response to this lack of data, the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) and the POLICY Project carried out this study, which served a dual purpose: (1) to identify the social and economic impact that HIV/AIDS is having on children, adolescents, and their guardians, and (2) to help policymakers, donors, and development partners identify policies and programs that would likely be effective in mitigating the impact of HIV/AIDS. This study demonstrates that it is imperative that policymakers, program managers, donors, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), PLHAs, and orphans and vulnerable children work together to identify a means of providing services that target the most vulnerable children while addressing the unique needs of every child. The recommendations set forth in this study are based on the study findings, as well as findings from a workshop that was held in August 2004.
    Khmer
    CAM_OVC_Kh.pdf
  • This study was commissioned by CARE Cambodia and the Policy Project, and is intended to provide NGOs and the public sector with an overview of the current situation regarding voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT) in Cambodia as well as to highlight some options for developing greater NGO/government interaction on VCCT. Both CARE and the Policy Project are committed to services that are built on a rights-based approach, and for this reason a key focus of the study is to identify ways of increasing the involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) in the design, development and monitoring of services.
    English
    CAMB_VCT.pdf