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Browse POLICY Project (1995-2006) Materials

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List entries are alphabetical by title and contain the title, abstract, language, and then the filename which is hyperlinked and will open in a new browser window. Many files are PDFs but some of the older ones are Word documents.

Uganda

  • English
    uganda.pdf
  • Worldwide, over 500,000 women and girls die of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth each year. The tragedy - and opportunity - is that most of these deaths can be prevented with cost-effective health care services. POLICY's MNPI series provides country-specific data on maternal and neonatal health programs in more than 30 developing countries. Based on a study conducted by the Futures Group and funded through the MEASURE Evaluation Project, the MNPI is a tool that can be used to: Assess current health care services; Identify program strengths and weaknesses; Plan strategies to address deficiencies; Encourage political and popular support for appropriate action; and Track progress over time.
    English
    Uganda_MNPI.pdf
  • Worldwide, over 500,000 women and girls die of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth each year. The tragedy - and opportunity - is that most of these deaths can be prevented with cost-effective health care services. POLICY's MNPI series provides country-specific data on maternal and neonatal health programs in more than 30 developing countries. Based on a study conducted by the Futures Group and funded through the MEASURE Evaluation Project, the MNPI is a tool that can be used to: Assess current health care services; identify program strengths and weaknesses; plan strategies to address deficiencies; encourage political and popular support for appropriate action; and track progress over time.
    English
    Uganda_MNPI_2002.pdf
  • English
    2005Uganda.pdf
  • Despite some attempts to integrate family planning with sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV/AIDS services, policies and programs continue to treat them as unrelated areas of intervention. Furthermore, international attention to the HIV/AIDS pandemic has overshadowed attention to family planning, particularly in Africa where the HIV/AIDS epidemic is most acute. Yet family planning is closely related to two components of HIV/AIDS services: prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). Is there a role for family planning in the context of HIV/AIDS programs? This paper analyzes how international guidelines, national HIV/AIDS policies and PMTCT and VCT policies have addressed family planning in 16 high-HIV prevalence countries. It also describes major gaps in the various countries’ policy environment.
    English
    wps-09.pdf
  • This four-page brief describes the status of youth in Uganda and the policy environment within which the Uganda Reproductive Health Advocacy Network worked to achieve government approval and implementation of the first comprehensive National Adolescent Health Policy.
    English
    Uganda country brief.pdf
  • In November 2004, Uganda’s cabinet of ministers adopted a policy on orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) following three years of organised and structured data collection, analysis, stakeholder workshops, and other efforts to which the POLICY Project contributed. POLICY offered to further examine the adequacy of existing laws and policies for meeting needs of OVC and to assess the degree to which existing laws and policies are implemented, identify weaknesses in enforcement provisions and institutional arrangements, and make recommendations for responding to legal-policy gaps and strengthening enforcement mechanisms. Part One of this summary describes the first study of legal-policy issues and Part Two describes the analysis and recommendations regarding the National Council for Children. The full reports of the studies can be obtained upon request from the POLICY/Uganda or POLICY/DC office.
    English
    Uga_OVC_Sum.pdf
  • Uganda has had laudable success in reducing HIV prevalence in the country and is still focused on strengthening and scaling up prevention, treatment and care, and support efforts. Currently, over 1 million people are estimated to have received HIV counseling and testing, over 500,000 HIV-positive individuals are receiving palliative care and over 60,000 are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Access to services has increased as service delivery sites have expanded into rural areas. With a prevalence rate that appears to have stalled at around 7 percent and new infections continuing to occur among those of reproductive age, the epidemic still requires policy and program attention.
    English
    Uganda TOO Final 12 20 05.pdf