Welcome to the USAID-funded Health Policy Plus project website.

Maternal Health

Overview

The global drive to improve maternal health has made striking progress in recent decades, vastly expanding women's access to skilled providers during childbirth in most countries. Still, widespread disrespect and abuse of women and girls by healthcare workers during labor and childbirth exposes the continued gaps between articulated human rights ideals and maternal health standards of care, and the stark realities that many women and girls experience daily. In response, a growing multisectoral movement of maternal health providers and implementers, global institutions, and human rights advocates has advanced policy and programmatic support for respectful maternity care (RMC).

In many low-resource countries, women and babies die needlessly from a severe shortage of qualified midwives. The shortage is worsened by poor working conditions in ill-equipped facilities, low salaries, and the lack of supervision and opportunity for career advancement, especially in rural areas. Addressing the critical healthcare workforce gap that puts women and infants at risk requires increased attention to the voices of midwives, along with widespread policy and financial support to sustain their vital work.

Publications

What We Do

HP+ works to catalyze action at both global and national levels to advance progress toward the World Health Organization's targets and strategies for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM); the Sustainable Development Goals; and the Every Woman, Every Child global strategy for reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health; as well as for USAID's plan for Ending Preventable Child and Maternal Deaths.

Our work advocates that maternal health and RMC issues be strongly reflected in global monitoring frameworks, including the Every Woman, Every Child global strategy for reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health; and the EPMM agenda and indicator framework.

News

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